The Grobbel Family Descendants of der schwarze Gobelen von Obringhausen

Notes


10. Elsa Grobbelen

[Grobbel.ftw]

"Er Nahm bei seiner Einheirat auf Grobbeln Hof nach Landesbrauch den Hof namen an".
"He accepted the farm name, when he married onto the Grobbel farm, like it was a common thing".

Elsa Grobbelen inherited the Grobbel Family Ancestral Farm (Grobbel Hof) in Obringhausen, which was unusual since the family farm always went to the eldest surviving male child. This made her "choice" marriage material since it represented an opportunity for a younger son (such as Jacob Boddecker) to acquire a farm of his own through marriage.Their children's surname in German would be "Boddecker, genannt Grobbelen" (abbreviated as Boddecker, gt. Grobbelen). In English, this means "Boddecker, called Grobbelen". People were "called" according to the name of the Hof that they were born (or lived) on, even if their father was born on a different Hof.

The net effect of this practice is that the woman who inherited the farm kept her maiden name, her husband accepted her maiden name as his own and their children were called by her maiden name (but for record-keeping purposes, the children's surname took the form ("father's surname", gt. "mother's maiden surname")


gt. Grobbel Jakob Böddecker

[Grobbel.ftw]

"Er Nahm bei seiner Einheirat auf Grobbeln Hof nach Landesbrauch den Hof namen an".
"He accepted the farm name, when he married onto the Grobbel farm, like it was a common thing".

Elsa Grobbelen inherited the Grobbel Family Ancestral Farm (Grobbel Hof) in Obringhausen, which was unusual since the family farm always went to the eldest surviving male child. This made her "choice" marriage material since it represented an opportunity for a younger son (such as Jacob Bodecker) to acquire a farm of his own through marriage. Their children's surname in German would be "Bodecker, genannt Grobbelen" (abbreviated as Bodecker, gt. Grobbelen). In English, this means "Bodecker, called Grobbelen". People were "called" according to the name of the Hof that they were born on, even if their father was born on a different Hof.

The net effect of this practice is that the woman who inherited the farm kept her maiden name, her husband accepted her maiden name as his own and their children were called by her maiden name (but for record-keeping purposes, the children's surname took the form ("father's surname", gt. "mother's maiden surname")